How to Use WordPress to Save $2,760 per Year on Your Real Estate Website

This post contains sponsored content and affiliate links. Find Tyro’s original post here.

How to Use WordPress to Save $2760 Per Year On Your Real Estate Website tyro 11-01

Have you ever bought a used car and got the feeling that the salesman wasn’t genuine? Almost like they were trying to get every last cent out of you?

Website designers can give us the same feeling of suspicion, and it’s not uncommon to get a quote for a basic real estate website that is close to $3,000.

Web designers justify this price by arguing that every website is unique and takes time to build. Designers also tend to incorporate software that has a monthly fee, and these subscriptions add up fast.

The high costs are why many REALTORS® choose to build their own websites using platforms like Wix or Squarespace. The drag and drop functionality is easy to use and there’s a quick learning curve. But did you know WordPress is drag and drop as well? You don’t have to know how to code to set up a WordPress site, it just takes a few clicks.

This post will show how anyone can design a beautiful, professional-looking real estate website using FREE WordPress plugins.

If you’d like to learn how to build your own real estate website with WordPress, sign up now for Tyro’s WordPress Workshop for REALTORS®.

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What Are WordPress Plugins?

  • A WordPress plugin is a small program that adds specific functionality to a website.
  • WordPress is open source, which means any web designer can create plugins.
  • Because WordPress is the most popular website building platform, there are thousands of web developers who have built thousands of free plugins.
  • Plugins are installed with a single click, and once installed, they allow us to enhance our website’s user experience.

Now that we understand what plugins are, let’s explore 7 common features of real estate websites and show how FREE WordPress plugins can accomplish the same results.

What is the best way to add walk-through tours to a real estate website?

The Paid Option

Real Tour Vision offers walk-through tour software starting at $29 per month. That works out to $348 per year.

The FREE WordPress Plugin Option

The same feature can be implemented using the Smart Slider 3 plugin. Once Smart Slider 3 is installed with a single click, as many walk-throughs as needed can be made. The slideshows allow clients to click through photos and all slideshows are mobile friendly.

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What is the best way to map all current listings on a real estate website?

The Paid Option

BatchGeo offers the ability to map current listings starting at $99 per month. That works out to $1,188 per year.

The FREE WordPress Plugin Option

The same feature can be implemented using the Easy Property Listings plugin. It allows you to create a map of our current listings, publish information about properties and sort properties by price, date, and status.

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What is the best way to make a real estate website mobile responsive?

The Paid Option

mobiSiteGalore creates a mobile version of your site starting at $19 per month. That works out to $228 per year.

The FREE WordPress Plugin Option

The same feature comes standard with almost every modern WordPress theme. For example, the theme Tyro uses in their WordPress For REALTORS® course has responsiveness built in. This means there’s nothing to install to create a good experience for the 90% of homebuyers that access websites on mobile.

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What is the best way to capture leads from a real estate website?

The Paid Option

JotForm offers form builders to capture leads starting at $19 per month. That works out to $228 per year.

The FREE! WordPress Plugin Option

The same feature can be implemented using the Site Origin Contact Form widget. Collecting customer information, specifically an email or phone number, is critical to closing a lead. Contact Form Widget allows customization of all fields so you can get whatever information you need, and there’s no limit on the number of forms you can make.

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What is the best way to live chat with visitors on a real estate website?

The Paid Option

Live Chat Inc offers live chat capabilities starting at $30 per month. That works out to $360 per year.

The FREE! WordPress Plugin Option

The same feature can be implemented using the Zotabox Facebook Live Chat plugin. Your website visitors can reach out to you through the chat box and all messaging occurs through Facebook Messenger. This chat works on both desktop and mobile. How to Use WordPress to Save $2760 Per Year On Your Real Estate Website tyro 5

What is the best way to add testimonials to a real estate website?

The Paid Option

TestimonialTree offers the ability to collect and publish testimonials starting at $30 per month. That works out to $360 per year.

The FREE! WordPress Plugin Option

The same feature can be implemented using the SiteOrigin Testimonials widget. Testimonials are the most important aspect of any site. Clients want to know that they are going to be taken care of and testimonials help put worries to rest.

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Why is WordPress better than other drag-and-drop website builders?

WordPress is better because the open source network of developers has made thousands of plugins that anyone can use for free. Just by using the seven plugins listed above, one can save $2760 per year.

If you’re still not convinced WordPress is the best choice, it’s also more affordable than Wix and Squarespace. Both cost $16 per month, but hosting a WordPress site on HostGator only costs $12 per month.

That’s $48 per year in savings that can be spent on either 48 meals at McDonald’s or one meal at Whole Foods.

If you’d like to learn how to build your own real estate website with WordPress, sign up now for Tyro’s WordPress Workshop for REALTORS®.

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59 Minute Meeting Recap: Transportation

Mathew Stoll, Executive Director at Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho (COMPASS), addressing the crowd.

Mathew Stoll, Executive Director of Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho (COMPASS), addressing the crowd.

Thank you to everyone who attended our fourth and final 59 Minute Meeting for 2017! We had a packed room of BRR members who listened and participated in an interesting discussion about the future of transportation in our area. Our panel of experts included Amy Revis, District Engineer Idaho Transportation Department (ITD); Mathew Stoll, Executive Director of Community Planning Association of Southwest Idaho (COMPASS); and Bruce Wong, Director of the Ada County Highway District (ACHD).

Our speakers highlighted how these organizations are working together to prepare for the transportation needs of the Boise region’s growing population, estimated to exceed one million people by 2036, while continuing to maintain current infrastructure and address safety issues.

Amy Revis, District Engineer Idaho Transportation Department (ITD), talks transportation at BRR.

Amy Revis, District Engineer Idaho Transportation Department (ITD), talks transportation at BRR.

Each speaker noted how Idaho’s leaders are not meeting funding requirements for current maintenance needs, let alone the new projects and expansions needed to support projected growth. During the Q & A portion of the meeting, they answered questions regarding safety, public transit, and ways to advocate for additional transportation funding.

REALTOR® advocacy efforts will play a crucial part in working with our elected leaders to ensure that our growth is well planned and adequately funded. Learn about the role of RPAC and how it enables us to elect leaders who understand the importance of properly funding transportation and other community needs.

Bruce Wong, Director of the Ada County Highway District (ACHD) discusses a charity event put on by ACHD.

Bruce Wong, Director of the Ada County Highway District (ACHD) discusses a charity event.

Thank you for attending, and look for information about our next 59 Minute Meeting in the coming months!

$3 Billion Worth of Homes Have Sold in Ada County, Setting New Record

Ada County home sales surpassed the $3 billion-mark for the first time, based on Total Dollar Volume figures year-to-date, January 1–November 30, 2017.

Historically, the month of December adds another $100-150 million worth of sales, on average going back to 2005, so we should see Total Dollar Volume exceed $3.1 billion for all of 2017.

Year-to-date through November 2017, nearly 10,000 homes sold in Ada County, up just 2.6% compared to 2016. Breaking this down by property type illustrates the impact limited supply has had on existing home prices, as well as higher building costs on new home prices:

November 2017 Table

As shown in the chart above, existing home sales were nearly even with last year, yet total dollar volume increased by 9.2%. This means that individual home sale prices had to increase, as buyers competed for persistent, limited inventory of existing homes, which was down 13.2% compared to last year at this time.

In contrast, new home sales were up by 10.9% over last year, with a slight uptick in inventory. With a more balanced supply of new homes compared to demand, the 17.9% growth in total dollar volume mostly reflects the increased costs of land, materials, and labor that builders are including in new home prices.

Total Dollar Volume, for existing and new construction combined, has been steadily increasing since 2009. The previous high point was in 2006 when Total Dollar Volume Sold was nearly $2.7 billion. Here’s a historical look at Total Dollar Volume since 2005:

November 2017 Charts

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood — including monthly statistics for November 2017 — are now available in the monthly market report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County, Canyon County, and Gem County:

ADA Snapshot - November 17

CANYON Snapshot - November 17GEM Snapshot - November 17

Download print quality snapshot graphics for Ada CountyCanyon County, and Gem County.

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This report is provided Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR). BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,400 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance. || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

NAR Conference Report — November 2017

Experiences and highlights from the REALTORS® Conference & Expo in Chicago ranged from BRR President Katrina Wehr graduating from NAR’s Leadership Academy, to BRR Director of Government Affairs Soren Dorius presenting to two national committees, not to mention NAR Director Carey Farmer being recognized as Idaho REALTOR® of the year, committee work, roundtables, educational sessions, and the NAR board meeting. BRR attendees had much to share and even more to bring back to our association.

Notes, session takeaways, and ideas from BRR attendees:

NAR Director Carey Farmer

  • Encourage your clients to register with realtor, a platform for current and prospective homeowners to voice their opinion on NAR policy issues, similar to the REALTOR® Action Center for NAR members.
  • Speaking of the REALTOR® Action Center, please encourage five colleagues to text “Realtor” or “Action” to 30466, to download the app and respond to the current (and future!) calls for action quickly and easily.
  • Save the date for upcoming NAR Conferences… 2018 Legislative Meetings & Expo — May 14-19 in Washington, D.C., and 2018 REALTORS® Conference — November 2-5 in Boston!

 BRR President Katrina Wehr

  • Leadership Academy — I was pleased to participate in the 2017 NARLA class, and a great opportunity to learn about the inner workings of NAR and build lasting relationships with my classmates. I’m sure I’ll gain personal and professional benefits from that for years to come! Kit Fitzgerald is the chair in 2018 and it will be the first year of their partnership with REALTOR® University. Applications for 2018 are now closed but here’s the link if you’re interested in the future: realtor/programs/leadership-academy.
  • The Hub — For those serving on NAR committees, communication will now run through “The Hub.” From their website: “It’s a private, secure location where committee members can network and collaborate with each other year-round and have anytime access to those discussions via a computer or mobile device.”

BRR President-Elect Gary Salisbury

  • Large Board Forum — Two major topics were “coming soon” rules and professionalism. On the first topic, many boards were unsure how to approach the coming soon issue and look to MLSs like ours as an example, but may encourage NAR to create guidance or policy for consistency. Regarding professionalism, the consensus was that it’s the broker or team leader’s responsibility.
  • Charitable Foundation Idea Exchange — There were some productive discussions around the purpose of foundations, grant applications, fundraising, events and ideas for communicating the value year-round.
  • On a personal note, a very stirring moment for me was when, James Cornelison, who sings for the Chicago Blackhawks hockey team lead us in the Star-Spangled Banner at the general session. Very powerful!

BRR Vice President Phil Mount

  • The roundtable discussions I attended noted a lot of problems similar sized associations have that simply are not issues for us. Lots of associations are in highly competitive markets and can’t do much to improve services and are having trouble with CORE standards, or are dealing with mergers of equally sized boards.
  • Professional standards is of concern to most everyone. One association now has a two day long new agent orientation!  (Content includes ethics and mandated classes.)  Some associations have fairly hefty fines and onerous reviews of even relatively minor infractions.  And in Ontario, Canada the process for getting licensed takes 6 months and lots of money, including a $2,000 member initiation fee to join the association. (As a result, they have far fewer licensed agents.)
  • I was surprised to see some local associations have a Leadership Academy for their Board members and committee Chairs & Vice Chairs. One is 13 weeks long, meeting every other week and includes media training from a local TV Anchor, and with Fire Departments, Police Departments and City council & highway district meetings. (Similar to the Leadership Boise program.) I think we could leverage some of this without a formal structure.
  • Advocacy will become a growing part of NAR, with proposed dues increases to fund expanded grants and initiatives. So great to see BRR as a model for how that gets done, and recognized for our efforts.
  • After listening to Lawrence Yun, I am cautiously optimistic about the next year. The outcome of the tax bill will certainly have an impact, but household formation is increasing and population is growing. Demand is there, we just need to ensure affordability is maintained. This is where advocacy becomes such an essential part of what we do going forward.

BRR Chief Executive Officer Breanna Vanstrom

  • Eight (8) BRR members were approved for NAR Emeritus status, recognizing 40 years of continuous membership! Those members will be announced and recognized in early 2018.
  • As a member of the Membership Policy and Board Jurisdiction Committee, we recommended that the Board approve a change in the bylaws approval process to a compliance certification process. (The Board did approve this for 2018.) This process will also reduce the number of required items that each association must adopt, so BRR’s Bylaws Committee will review that next year. Some of the elements that have been adopted may be moved to a new policy manual.
  • As a member of the Association Executive Young Professionals Network Advisory Board (AE YPN), we discussed career development resources to share with other AEs, especially those that cannot attend national meetings. We also discussed partnerships with the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). I will serve as Vice Chair in 2018.
  • As Vice Chair of the Staff Specialist Job Description Work Group, we compiled sample job descriptions to help local and state associations identify responsibilities for nearly 32 positions. These will be uploaded to the REALTOR® Association Resource Exchange (RARE) for AEs to access.

 BRR Director of Events and Community Engagement Shari Fernandez

COMMUNICATIONS

  • From the Consumer Committee: The NAR AdCenter is up and running – members can access the information directly. We will be adding AdCenter to our Content Corner as a resource to members for use in their social media and marketing. We will also work to add some information about how to access the content and highlighting it as a resource.
  • Communication Directors Networking Session is a great resource for staff! Some tips and tools taken away from the meeting include: animation tools, Instagram campaigns, CFA tips, and Fair Housing tools.

FOUNDATION

  • The Minneapolis Association is working to see if they can get a charitable giving module added to RAMCO to be able to track donors and giving. As a RAMCO user we would benefit from this as well.
  • As we grow the Foundation, we need to develop a gift acceptance policy – other foundations have received land donations and other non-monetary items.
  • We can better utilize Idaho Gives Day (May) and our Foundation Engagement Month (Aug or Sep) to increase awareness of matching gifts and volunteer service.

BRR Director of Government Affairs Soren Dorius

  • My first takeaway is the impact we can have on fellow REALTOR® associations (and impact they can have on us) through sharing experiences and collaborating on successful ideas and events. Being asked to present in front of the Smart Growth Advisory Committee, as well as the Issues Mobilization Support Committee, was an incredible opportunity to highlight the great things we are doing at BRR. I was able to share our unique approach to advocacy through the use of REALTOR® Party grants, as well as explain our overall philosophy of putting our money where our mouth is and investing into our communities. This message resonated with fellow REALTORS® from boards all over the country, and allowed us to make an impact. Likewise, I learned a lot about other cool projects other associations have conducted.
  • “The Future of the REALTOR® Party” presidential advisory group (PAG) announced their recommendation for NAR to spend an additional $25 per NAR member per year, that will go directly into strengthening REALTOR® Party tools and resources. If NAR doesn’t find the funds elsewhere, they could look to an increase in membership dues. This is all just a recommendation for now, and the number changes may still occur. They have just asked that we start the conversation about doing this, since there is such a high (and fast growing) demand for REALTOR® Party grants throughout the country. As your GAD, I have found tremendous value in the use of these grants, having received over $76,000 in 2017 alone. I am very intrigued by the idea of strengthening these tools, and look forward to seeing more details in the coming months.

BRR Director of Education Angela Gibson

  • Great ideas from panel discussions to include in BRR professionalism segments and/or panels for new(er) members — How to show a house/open house; Tips for working with Affiliates, Agents, and Clients; Better explain the difference between a Licensed Agent and a REALTOR®; and, How to proper fill out Contracts and Forms.
  • Ways for improved broker engagement or to add to weekly Broker Bulletins — (a) Required training that each Broker must take once every two years that follows NAR bi-annual ethics requirement; (b) Brokers will spend the day at BRR for free or very low cost. The day will start with association update, followed by Ethics course a break for lunch. After lunch there is a broker class, either from NAR or one already approved for CE; and, (c) Roundtables about, What can BRR do for you? Your brokerage? Your new members? Trends/issues you’re dealing with? (Similar to the IR Broker Summits, or maybe in collaboration with them.)

Looking for more information? Below are conference resources provided by NAR for reference and/or download:

Wondering what’s been happening with the National Association of REALTORS® in 2017? This video provides a short overview.

 

Ada County Home Prices Reach New Record in August While the Pace of Growth Steadies

Three main factors continue to drive housing demand in Ada County — increased economic development, limited housing supply, and a growing population — resulting in a record high median sales price in August 2017 of $278,000, up 9.6% from a year ago. Yet while the actual median sales price continues trending upwards, the rate at which it does so has been slowing down.

Yet while the actual median sales price continues trending upwards, the rate at which it does so… Click To Tweet Think of it like driving your car up a hill: as the road gets steeper, the speed at which you drive decreases. You’re still gaining ground, just not as quickly.

MSP vs YOY Percent Change in Median Sales Price for Ada County

In January 2015, the Ada County real estate market began to see steadier, year-over-year price growth each month, at 7.9% on average through August 2017. Looking back to January 2012 (when the market recovery began) through December 2014, year-over-year price growth fluctuated each month at a much higher average of 13.2%.

These early fluctuations were closely tied to changes in mortgage interest rates.

Rising home prices are great for sellers and our economy overall, but eventually, can cause affordability concerns for buyers, even with low mortgage interest rates. Slowing price increases could be an early indicator of the market coming back into balance, but as long as consumer demand outpaces the number of homes for sale, that low supply vs. high demand relationship should keep actual prices moving up.

Canyon County is experiencing the same slowing price growth. From January 2012 to December 2014, the average monthly, year-over-year median sales price increase was 18.9%, compared to the average for January 2015 to August 2017 of 10.5%. The actual median sales price in Canyon County for August 2017 was not a new record, but it was up 11.0% from August 2016 to $183,000.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the August 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Market Report - August 2017_Page_03

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - August 17

CANYON Snapshot - August 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,300 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

REALTORS® Donate $1,000 to Assist Those Affected by Harvey

The BRR Board of Directors donated $1,000 to the REALTORS® Relief Foundation (RRF) to help cover housing-related expenses for those caught in the wake of Hurricane Harvey’s devastation in southern Texas and Louisiana.

The tropical storm brought with it 100 mph winds, historic rainfall, and catastrophic flooding — damaging homes and displacing more than a million people.

“REALTORS® support each other and the communities in which we live and work, here at home and across the country,” said Katrina Wehr, 2017 President of Boise Regional REALTORS® and REALTOR® with Keller Williams Realty Boise.  “We want to do our part to help those who have been uprooted and have endured the unimaginable.”

BRR is joined by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service and Idaho REALTORS®, as well as individual REALTORS®, in donating to the REALTORS® Relief Foundation. The overhead costs of running the foundation are covered by the National Association of REALTORS®, so 100 percent of donations go directly to victims of disaster. More information about the RRF is available at nar.realtor.

Boise Regional REALTORS® Board of Directors present a $1,000 to the REALTORS® Relief Foundation to assist those affected by Hurricane Harvey. From left to right: Katrina Wehr, President; Phil Mount, Vice President; Carey Farmer, Past President; Danielle Cullip, Treasurer; Gary Salisbury, President-Elect. Photo provided by Boise Regional REALTORS®.

Boise Regional REALTORS® Board of Directors present $1,000 to the REALTORS® Relief Foundation to assist those affected by Hurricane Harvey. From left to right: Katrina Wehr, President; Phil Mount, Vice President; Carey Farmer, Past President; Danielle Cullip, Treasurer; Gary Salisbury, President-Elect. Photo provided by Boise Regional REALTORS®.

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The REALTORS® Relief Foundation (RRF) was established by the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) in 2001 to provide housing-related assistance to victims of natural or man-made disasters. Since its launch, RRF has raised more than $25 million for victims of disasters, such as wildfires, floods, tornados, and hurricanes. This charitable foundation is dedicated to providing housing-related assistance to victims of disaster.

Boise Regional REALTORS® (or BRR) represents more than 4,300 real estate professionals throughout the Boise region, providing resources to help members conduct their businesses professionally, ethically, and successfully. BRR has two wholly-owned subsidiaries, the Intermountain MLS and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. Visit boirealtors.com, intermountainmls.com, and boirealtors.com/realtor-foundation/ for more information.

What Your REALTOR®’s Designation Means

Finding the right professional to help you navigate a real estate transaction is smart. At BRR, we always recommend working with a REALTOR®. That term, “REALTOR®,” indicates a real estate licensee who is also a member of the National Association of REALTORS® and has agreed to abide by a strict Code of Ethics.

And within the REALTOR® membership, there are those who have earned additional designations, giving them additional knowledge and resources into various niche markets or pieces of the transaction.

We’ve compiled a list of directories where you can search for a REALTOR® based on these designations:

For Residential Real Estate Services

ABR

Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR®) — Find a REALTOR® focused on working directly with buyer-clients at every stage of the home-buying process.

 

 

CRS

Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) — Find a REALTOR® who has completed advanced education around the listing and sale of residential real estate, and who completes a certain number of transactions annually.

 

 

mrpdesc

Military Relocation Professional (MRP) — Find a REALTOR® focused on working with current and former military service members.

 

 

rsps_logo

Resort and Second-Home Property Specialist (RSPS) — Find a REALTORS® who specializes in buying, selling, or management of properties for investment, development, retirement, or second homes in resort, recreational, and/or vacation destinations. (NOTE: Select “Resort & Second-Home Property Specialist” under the Certifications section.)

 

SRS_vctrLGO+txtSeller Representative Specialist (SRS) — Find a REALTOR® focused on working directly with seller-clients.

 

 

SRESSeniors Real Estate Specialist® (SRES®) — Find a REALTOR® focused on meeting the needs of maturing Americans when selling, buying, relocating, or refinancing residential or investment properties.

 

 

For Commercial Real Estate Services

CCIM-220Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) — Real estate professionals who are experts in the commercial and investment real estate industry. CCIMs include brokers, leasing professionals, investment counselors, asset managers, appraisers, corporate real estate executives, property managers, developers, institutional investors, commercial lenders, attorneys, bankers, and other more.

 

CPMCertified Property Managers® (CPM®) — Experts in the management of public housing developments, apartment complexes, homeowners’ associations, manufactured housing parks, mixed use and office buildings, parking garages, single- and multi-family rental housing, student housing, and more.

 

 

SIORSociety of Industrial and Office REALTORS® (SIOR) — Specialists in the industrial and office markets of real estate, with a minimum of three years’ experience and who have completed a certain number of transactions.

 

 

Other Business Specialties

ACLAccredited Land Consultants (ALCs) — REALTORS® who are experts in brokering sales and purchases of land, including investments, tax deferred 1031 exchanges, and more.

 

 

CIPSlogoCertified International Property Specialist (CIPS) — REALTORS® who have undergone specialized training focused on conducting business in the international real estate arena.

 

 

PrintGreen — REALTORS® who have taken advanced education to counsel clients on issues of energy efficiency and sustainability in real estate.

 

 

SFRShort Sales and Foreclosure Resource (SFR®) — REALTORS® who have taken advanced education to help buyers and sellers of distressed properties. (NOTE: Select “Short Sales and Foreclosure Resource” under the Certifications section.)

 

To search for REALTORS® across these designations and more, nationwide or here in the Boise region, visit realtor.com® or the National Association of REALTORS® using their “Find a REALTOR®” tools.

Are you a REALTOR® looking to get on one of these lists? Visit NAR’s Designations and Certifications page for details on the designations listed above. You’ll also find information about other programs that will enhance your business management skills and knowledge of the real estate industry, including: At Home With Diversity® (AHWD®), Certified Real Estate Brokerage Manager (CRB), Certified Real Estate Team Specialist (C-RETS), Counselors of Real Estate (CRE), Graduate REALTOR® Institute (GRI), Performance Management Network (PMN), Pricing Strategy Advisory (PSA), Real Estate Negotiation Expert (RNE), e-PRO®, as well as, the General Accredited Appraiser (GAA) and Residential Accredited Appraiser (RAA).

Ada and Canyon County Housing Inventory Down for 34 Consecutive Months

At Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR), we feel like we’ve been talking about low inventory for months… and for good reason.

A few weeks ago, Zillow’s Chief Economist Svenja Gudell posted on Twitter: “Inventory down YoY for 25 consecutive months now. We’re just past 2-years into the #inventorycrisis.” While we never like when the term “crisis” is used to describe the housing market, the sentiment reflects the pressure that many home buyers are feeling caused by the low inventory levels, especially for existing homes.

Ada and Canyon County Housing Inventory Down for 34 Consecutive Months Click To Tweet

Gudell’s comments were based on nationwide trends, so what does this look like in the Boise Region?

Based on monthly data, inventory of existing homes in both Ada and Canyon counties has been down year-over-year for 34 consecutive months, starting October 2014. Let’s break this down by inventory (supply) and pending sales (demand)…

Metrics Ada Existing Canyon Existing
Oct-14 Jul-17 % Chg Oct-14 Jul-17 % Chg
Inventory (Supply) 1,702 1,238 -27.3% 886 600 -32.3%
Pending (Demand) 628 1,078 +71.7% 307 537 +76.6%
Months Supply of Inventory 3.2 1.4 -56.3% 3.3 1.5 -54.5%

 

Inventory of existing homes in Ada County was at 1,702 in October 2014 and 1,238 in July 2017, a decrease of 27.3%. In comparison, there were 628 pending sales in October 2014 versus 1,078 in July 2017, an increase of 71.7%. Pending sales are homes under contract that should close within 30-90 days.

Looking at months supply of existing inventory — which takes the number of homes for sale divided by the average number of sales by month — there were 3.2 months in October 2014 in Ada County to 1.4 months in July 2017, a drop of 56.3%. (A balanced market—not favoring buyers or sellers—is typically between 4-6 months supply of inventory.)

In Canyon County, inventory of existing homes was at 886 in October 2014 and 600 in July 2017, a decrease of 32.3%. In comparison, there were 307 pending sales in October 2014 versus 537 in July 2017, an increase of 76.6%. That put months supply of inventory at 3.3 months in October 2014 compared to 1.5 months in June 2017, a drop of 54.5%.

How has the decrease in supply and increase in demand influenced home prices in the Boise Region? The median sales price of existing homes in Ada County increased 34.2% between October 2014 and July 2017, and increased 42.2% in Canyon County during that same period, illustrating BRR’s familiar refrain of how home prices are being driven by demand compared to supply.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the July 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - July 17

CANYON Snapshot - July 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,000 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

REALTORS® > Tech

REALTORS greater than Tech slider

Adapted from BRR’s weekly “Broker Bulletin” email series.

Did you catch the Inman article, “3 things real estate agents will always do better than tech disruptors,” written by Anthony Hitt, CEO for Engel & Völkers Americas? If not, I wanted to bring it to your attention.

The key takeaway was this: “Agents who embrace technology as a way to enhance their existing skill sets, understand how to pivot and hone their ability to deliver a superior experience to their customers will be around for a very long time.”

I want to emphasize the idea of using technology to enhance your services.

It’s very easy to see technology as a threat to our industry, but I would argue that’s it’s a threat to (or change agent for) certain tasks of the transaction (search, transaction management, etc.) and to agents who are unable or unwilling to do what Mr. Hitt suggests: pivot and hone their services.

Here are the three areas he says where REALTORS® are greater than tech:

  1. Offering a personalized white glove experience — Great agents know how to create a personalized experience for each of their clients throughout the sales process, which a website or device simply cannot offer.
  1. Understanding the emotional impact — A good agent understands the emotional elements of this process for the buyers and sellers and doesn’t treat it as a simple, formulaic transaction.
  1. Guiding buyers and sellers — Technology can use certain algorithms, follow strict parameters and return search results, but it doesn’t understand why those parameters were given, offer feedback based on experience or market knowledge, or alter search criteria.

While I don’t think you would disagree with any of these things, we never talk about them. We don’t weave these ideas into our business philosophies and practices and review them on a regular basis. Instead, we talk about “how to get more agents using the new technology we implemented,” or “how to get more listings in your pipeline.” Those things are important, but we have to get back why we’re doing what we’re doing (shout out to Simon Sinek’s TED Talk), knowing the value we bring to the transaction, and then tell that story in our marketing, through our interactions with clients, etc. — while also delivering the results.

I don’t disagree that new products and services from tech companies can feel threatening when they’re first launched (and I’m not looking at any one company in particular, nor is this meant to start a debate about any of them). And I’m certainly not going to pretend that changing technology will not affect our business or impact customer preferences and expectations. Especially when there are literally hundreds (thousands?) of tech companies out there looking to change the way real estate is experienced by consumers.

These companies are spending millions and millions of dollars to figure out how to make buying or selling a home more efficient, more streamlined, more, whatever.

But you already do that.

So, use technology to help you do it better, and keep focused on serving clients before, during, and most importantly, after the transaction. You are closer to the consumer experience than any tech company, and you can see desires change and shift in real-time. Meaning, you can more quickly pivot and hone your services than any tech company ever could.

Boise Regional REALTORS® Paint Five Boise Homes

Local real estate professionals volunteered their time and resources by participating in this year’s Neighborworks® Paint the Town™, painting the homes of deserving residents who are unable to do it themselves. If you’ve ever painted a house, you know that this isn’t an easy task. Teams schedule working times with homeowners, perform hours of prep, painting and clean up. BRR teams often go above and beyond, trimming bushes and trees, and making repairs to the home prior to painting. One homeowner commented, “This is a better paint job than if we’d hired someone to do it!”

This year, BRR had five teams participate: Lysi Bishop Real Estate and Keller Williams Realty Boise painted house #1; The Independent Broker’s Council painted house #2; Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group painted house #3; AAD Inspection and Silvercreek Realty Group painted house #4; and BRR Young Professionals Network, Silverhawk Realty, and Templeton Real Estate painted house #5.

BRR Foundation has donated nearly $100,000 as a sponsor of Paint the Town™ since the foundation’s inception in 1995. Sponsorship funds help cover the cost of paint and materials for the event. The REALTOR® Outreach Committee (ROC), the working arm of the BRR Foundation, helps recruit volunteer teams and match teams with homeowners. If you’re interested in getting involved with ROC, BRR is currently accepting applications for 2018 committees. If you’d like to volunteer for next year’s Paint the Town™, we will share details on how to sign up in early spring 2018.

Thank you to our volunteers, and to everyone who supports the BRR Foundation. Your efforts reflect the fact that REALTOR® and affiliate members are committed to giving back to our community.

2017 Paint the Town Photo Gallery

Boise Regional REALTORS® Young Professionals Network (BRR YPN), Silverhawk Realty, and Templeton Real Estate teamed up to form one of the five teams participating in Paint the Town with Boise Regional REALTORS®. Volunteers pose with homeowners in front to nearly finished paint job.

Boise Regional REALTORS® Young Professionals Network (BRR YPN), Silverhawk Realty, and Templeton Real Estate teamed up to form one of the five teams participating in Paint the Town with Boise Regional REALTORS®. Volunteers pose with homeowners in front of the nearly finished paint job.

Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group

Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group was one of the five teams participating in Paint the Town with Boise Regional REALTORS®. Painters busy at work on Saturday, June 10, 2017.

Independent Brokers Council

The Independent Broker’s Council was one of the five teams participating in Paint the Town with Boise Regional REALTORS®. Volunteers in front of the house in progress.

Lysi Bishop KW with homeowners

Lysi Bishop Real Estate and Keller Williams Realty Boise House teamed up to form one of the five teams participating in Paint the Town with Boise Regional REALTORS®. Lysi Bishop Real Estate and Keller Williams Realty Boise volunteers gathered around the homeowners (centered) in front of the newly painted house.

AAD Inspection Silvercreek Realty Group

AAD Inspection and Silvercreek Realty Group teamed up to form one of the five teams participating in Paint the Town with Boise Regional REALTORS®. Volunteers putting the finishing touches on the freshly painted home.