Fast-Moving Housing Market Continues to be Driven by Demand

Despite rising home prices, today’s housing market doesn’t have much else in common with the market we saw prior to the recession.

The Boise Region’s housing market is being driven by real home buyer demand, not speculation, which was common a decade ago. And as we’ve mentioned before, the increase in demand and lack of inventory has pushed up home prices.

The Boise Region’s housing market is being driven by home buyer demand, not speculation. Click To Tweet

That demand for housing can be seen in the data (real or speculative) by looking at the Days on Market.

Days on Market metric (or DOM) counts the average number of days between when a property was listed and when an offer was accepted.

For example, in Ada County, home sales that closed in September spent an average of 32 days on the market before going under contract, 23.8% faster than in September 2016.

DOM doesn’t factor in the time between accepting an offer and closing (which can vary based on the time it takes to complete home inspections, repairs, financing, etc.), so it is a good indicator of the demand for housing, and how quickly sellers find buyers.

DOM is seasonal, meaning homes generally go under contract faster in the spring and summer and slower in the fall and winter. To see the overall trend, we used a 12-month rolling average to remove seasonality. Based on those figures, DOM for Ada County has been trending down since 2009, and since 2014, DOM has been tracking closely with falling inventory.

September 2017 DOM Trends Ada County - web

DOM Chart

The very low DOM of 32 days on average, between February 2006 and January 2007, shows just how quickly buyers were snatching up homes, despite having plenty of inventory to choose from. In the past year or so we’ve experienced quite the opposite — low DOM and very low inventory.

September 2017 DOM Trends Canyon County - webPrior to the recession, Canyon County saw a similar trend with shorter average DOM despite plenty of inventory to meet demand. Since late 2013, DOM has been tracking closely with inventory, indicating increasing demand as inventory drops.

While that historical comparison is another helpful distinction between today’s market and the pre-recession market, it’s not much consolation for today’s buyers who are often required to make quick decisions because of limited inventory. Unless there is a sudden influx of inventory or a quick drop in demand, we expect the market to continue to move quickly, even if we see some slight increases in Days on Market through the winter.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the September 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - September 17CANYON Snapshot - September 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR). BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,300 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

Copyrighted Real Estate Photos… Who Owns Them and Why?

Photography Copyright sliderAre you using a professional photographer to take photos of your listings? A pro has access to software, equipment, and tools you may not, carries the expense of their equipment and editing time, likely has faster shooting and turnaround times, will deal with the headache of organizing and storing large file images, and has the experience and knowledge to remove visual distractions (for example problems with color temperature, reflections, brightness, etc.) from their photos. Ideally, polished listing photos mean your marketing and brand are perceived as more professional, the home is better represented and sells faster than listings with amateur photos or no photos at all.

When dealing with copyrighted images, it is important to fully understand photo copyright laws and the rules for the MLS and any other platform where you plan to post the photos. Otherwise, you could find yourself in the middle of a lawsuit, fined, or at the very least, have the images removed. Take this court case against Zillow, for example.

When dealing with copyrighted images, it is important to fully understand photo copyright laws. Click To Tweet

The whole concept behind “who owns these photos?” was a bit blurry to me, so I sat down with professional photographer Tom Hamilton of Sightline Photography to better understand how the copyrights of real estate photos work.

Tom explained that a common misconception is that if an agent pays for photos, it’s implied that the photographer is giving them full rights to use those images. This is simply not true. Consider a home that you might rent. As the renter, you sign an agreement that you will rent the house for X amount of time, and pay an X amount of money. At the end of this contract, you don’t own the home — you simply paid an agreed upon amount of money for usage of the home under certain conditions. When you hire a photographer to take photos, you don’t own those images, you are paying for the usage of those images in a specific, agreed upon way.

Another comparison would be a music streaming service — you pay for the rights to stream music, but you don’t own the music itself. If you want to own rights to the music, you’d have to pay a much larger fee than your streaming subscription. A photographer sells you limited usage rights to the images, for a much lower cost than if you were to buy the full rights.

The bottom line is, you need explicit permission to use any photos you did not take. Permission needs to be clearly outlined in a written and signed agreement between the photographer and the agent, or whoever is paying for the photos. Here are a few sample agreements, or your photographer will likely have a standard one they use. Make sure to keep a copy for your records.

So, why is this even an issue? Photographers should be compensated fairly for their work, and problems arise when money is lost because someone uses their photos without permission and then profits (or has the potential to profit) from those photos. If you hire a photographer to shoot listing photos, and then a builder or property manager ends up using those same images for marketing purposes, the photographer loses out in two ways, 1) They didn’t collect any usage fees and 2) They weren’t hired for another shoot, and the offending party now has the potential to make a lot of money off photos they have no rights to.

Here is how it is addressed in section 11 of the Intermountain MLS Rules & Regulations

“By the act of submitting any property listing content to the MLS, the Participant represents that he or she has been authorized to grant and also thereby does grant authority for the MLS to include the property listing content in its copyrighted MLS compilation and also in any statistical report on “comparables”. Listing content includes, but is not limited to, photographs, images, graphics, audio and video recordings, virtual tours, drawings, descriptions, remarks, narratives, pricing information, and other details or information related to listed property.”

And in section 1.2:

“Any office or agent cannot use another agent’s or office’s photographs, digital images, virtual tours or sketches to promote a new/active listing without written permission. Any violation of this policy shall be considered a violation of the MLS Rules and Regulations and may be subject to a fine.”

Moral of the story? Don’t post or use photographs unless you have permission. Not sure if you have permission? Reference your agreement, and then ask your photographer if you need further clarification. Want to learn more? Check out REALTOR®Mag’s article “Protect Yourself Against Copyright Claims.”

Thinking about finding a photographer to work with?  Here are some tips for finding the right fit:

  • Make sure you find someone you can communicate with.
  • Get recommendations from your colleagues.
  • Ask to see samples of their work to determine if you like their personal style.
  • Professional photographers will also be insured. If they aren’t insured, you don’t want them going near your listings.
  • Find more tips from REALTOR®Mag’s article, “Rules for Hiring a High Quality Photographer.”

Update: IMLS members can market another member’s listing, as long as they have the listing agent’s permission and give credit to the listing brokerage. If you have other questions about this issue, please contact IMLS Director of Finance/Director of Rules and Policy, Kim Griffin.

Ada County Home Prices Reach New Record in August While the Pace of Growth Steadies

Three main factors continue to drive housing demand in Ada County — increased economic development, limited housing supply, and a growing population — resulting in a record high median sales price in August 2017 of $278,000, up 9.6% from a year ago.

Yet while the actual median sales price continues trending upwards, the rate at which it does so… Click To Tweet Think of it like driving your car up a hill: as the road gets steeper, the speed at which you drive decreases. You’re still gaining ground, just not as quickly.

MSP vs YOY Percent Change in Median Sales Price for Ada County

In January 2015, the Ada County real estate market began to see steadier, year-over-year price growth each month, at 7.9% on average through August 2017. Looking back to January 2012 (when the market recovery began) through December 2014, year-over-year price growth fluctuated each month at a much higher average of 13.2%.

These early fluctuations were closely tied to changes in mortgage interest rates.

Rising home prices are great for sellers and our economy overall, but eventually, can cause affordability concerns for buyers, even with low mortgage interest rates. Slowing price increases could be an early indicator of the market coming back into balance, but as long as consumer demand outpaces the number of homes for sale, that low supply vs. high demand relationship should keep actual prices moving up.

Canyon County is experiencing the same slowing price growth. From January 2012 to December 2014, the average monthly, year-over-year median sales price increase was 18.9%, compared to the average for January 2015 to August 2017 of 10.5%. The actual median sales price in Canyon County for August 2017 was not a new record, but it was up 11.0% from August 2016 to $183,000.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the August 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Market Report - August 2017_Page_03

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - August 17

CANYON Snapshot - August 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,300 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

REALTORS® > Tech

REALTORS greater than Tech slider

Adapted from BRR’s weekly “Broker Bulletin” email series.

Did you catch the Inman article, “3 things real estate agents will always do better than tech disruptors,” written by Anthony Hitt, CEO for Engel & Völkers Americas? If not, I wanted to bring it to your attention.

The key takeaway was this: “Agents who embrace technology as a way to enhance their existing skill sets, understand how to pivot and hone their ability to deliver a superior experience to their customers will be around for a very long time.”

I want to emphasize the idea of using technology to enhance your services.

It’s very easy to see technology as a threat to our industry, but I would argue that’s it’s a threat to (or change agent for) certain tasks of the transaction (search, transaction management, etc.) and to agents who are unable or unwilling to do what Mr. Hitt suggests: pivot and hone their services.

Here are the three areas he says where REALTORS® are greater than tech:

  1. Offering a personalized white glove experience — Great agents know how to create a personalized experience for each of their clients throughout the sales process, which a website or device simply cannot offer.
  1. Understanding the emotional impact — A good agent understands the emotional elements of this process for the buyers and sellers and doesn’t treat it as a simple, formulaic transaction.
  1. Guiding buyers and sellers — Technology can use certain algorithms, follow strict parameters and return search results, but it doesn’t understand why those parameters were given, offer feedback based on experience or market knowledge, or alter search criteria.

While I don’t think you would disagree with any of these things, we never talk about them. We don’t weave these ideas into our business philosophies and practices and review them on a regular basis. Instead, we talk about “how to get more agents using the new technology we implemented,” or “how to get more listings in your pipeline.” Those things are important, but we have to get back why we’re doing what we’re doing (shout out to Simon Sinek’s TED Talk), knowing the value we bring to the transaction, and then tell that story in our marketing, through our interactions with clients, etc. — while also delivering the results.

I don’t disagree that new products and services from tech companies can feel threatening when they’re first launched (and I’m not looking at any one company in particular, nor is this meant to start a debate about any of them). And I’m certainly not going to pretend that changing technology will not affect our business or impact customer preferences and expectations. Especially when there are literally hundreds (thousands?) of tech companies out there looking to change the way real estate is experienced by consumers.

These companies are spending millions and millions of dollars to figure out how to make buying or selling a home more efficient, more streamlined, more, whatever.

But you already do that.

So, use technology to help you do it better, and keep focused on serving clients before, during, and most importantly, after the transaction. You are closer to the consumer experience than any tech company, and you can see desires change and shift in real-time. Meaning, you can more quickly pivot and hone your services than any tech company ever could.

2017 Mid-Year Housing Summit Recap


Thanks to everyone who attended the 2017 Mid-Year Housing Summit from Boise Regional REALTORS®. If you missed the event, don’t worry! A summary of the discussions and links to the various presentations are available here.

Highlights from the Treasure Valley Policy Survey

Vaughn-BRR presentation_image

Dr. Justin Vaughn, Co-Director of the Center for Idaho History & Politics at Boise State University, presented the highlights from the most recent Treasure Valley Policy Survey, which gauged opinions and perceptions of Treasure Valley residents on a variety of topics, such as living and working in the Treasure Valley, economic development, taxes, education, transportation, and housing.

 

Justin Vaughn

The survey was conducted in September 2016, and the key findings were that residents view life in the Treasure Valley very positively, especially the quality of life, citing it as a good place to raise a family and build a career. The top reasons for living here included low crime, low cost of living, and a strong economy. The survey also found that there is concern about the pace of growth, and divided attitudes among Treasure Valley residents about how to fund affordable housing. For more details on the survey’s findings, download Dr. Vaughn’s presentation.

2017 Mid-Year Residential Real Estate Update

Mid-Year Housing Summit 2017 UPDATED 07122017 - shareable_image

Boise Regional REALTORS® CEO Breanna Vanstrom presented the market update.

Market Update

The Mid-Year Summit is an opportunity to take a step back halfway through the year to evaluate how the market has performed, compared to the same time last year. You can view the slides here, watch a video captured via Facebook Live, or read a summary of Breanna’s presentation below…

BRR Market Update presented by BRR CEO Breanna Vanstrom

Posted by Boise Regional Realtors on Thursday, July 20, 2017

Ada County homes sales are on track to surpass the $3 billion-mark for the first time in 2017. Year-to-date through June 2017, the total dollar volume sold was at $1.46 billion, which was 7.4% higher than the same time last year. The total dollar volume sold Canyon County year-to-date through June 2017, was at $ 417.1 million, which was 14.7% higher than through June of 2016.

BRR’s message to members has been consistent this year and last year: “Our housing market is growing from consumer demand vs. supply — not from speculation as was common a decade ago.” In addition, increased sales prices for newly constructed homes have also been pushing up the total dollar volume figures in 2017.

Three things continue to drive demand for housing in the Boise Region: increased economic development, limited housing supply putting pressure on inventory, and a growing population.

Yet while the actual median sales price continues to trend upwards, based on these factors, the rate at which it is increasing has been slowing down. Year-over-year price gains grew consistently through 2012, led by low mortgage rates and more sales at higher price points.

While the actual median sales price for both counties continues to trend upwards, the rate at which it does so has been more balanced since January 2015. It is important to explain that this slowdown in growth does not mean demand is waning. In fact, year-over-year demand is up, and in just the past few months, the number of pending sales have outpaced inventory.

How does this level of demand vs. supply, increasing (but leveling) prices affect affordability?

The National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) Housing Affordability Index (HAI), and an index value of 100 means that a family with the median income has exactly enough income to qualify for a mortgage on a median-priced existing home. An index above 100 signifies that a family earning the median income has more than enough income to qualify for a mortgage loan on a median-priced existing home. The higher the number the more affordable homes are in comparison to the median income.

BRR replicated NAR’s formula using local data to calculate HAI for Ada County on an annual basis and compare it to NAR’s index for the country overall. In 2016, Ada County’s HAI was at 174.8, a decrease of 2.8% compared to 2015, but 4.5% higher than the U.S. overall.

Our market is still affordable when compared to the nation as well as the Western and Pacific Northwestern regions. Looking at NAR’s figures, based on metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the Boise City-Nampa MSA was more affordable than Salt Lake City, Denver, Portland, and Seattle, in 2016. For markets with similar populations, we were more affordable than Cape Coral, FL, Colorado Springs, CO, and Lakeland, FL, but less affordable than Winston-Salem, NC, Syracuse, NY, and Akron, OH.

Certainly, the local economies, demographics, and other factors of the markets cited affect affordability in each area, but the comparison is a helpful benchmark as Boise’s growing population is a driver of home prices relative to supply.

So what can REALTORS® do to help their clients in these current market conditions? Three things: strategic prospecting, strategic listing terms, and setting expectations.

REALTORS® can look to their prospects and databases to identify property owners who could sell but don’t also need to buy, or buy locally. For example, people relocating for retirement or work, investors looking to cash-out single-family properties; or, “default” landlords — people who retained a home after a move or another purchase because they couldn’t afford to sell it previously (either didn’t have the equity, needed a quick move, etc.) and have been holding that property as a rental.

To help prospective sellers nervous about listing their home and not being able to find a place to move, consider making the acceptance of a purchase offers contingent on the successful purchase of another home or completion of new construction, rent-back agreements, or maybe extended closing periods.

To help keep buyer and seller expectations in line with the market, here are a few tips:

  • REALTORS® can review market comps regularly, talking to sellers about price adjustments or changing terms, based on what has sold, to avoid buyer fatigue or disinterest if the home is on for “too long.”
  • Discuss the differences between offer prices and appraisals, and what to do when there’s a gap.
  • With home inspections, help sellers determine what should be fixed instead of moving on to another buyer who “might not ask them to fix” the repair in question. For buyers, if they ask for too many repairs or concessions, could they lose the house and have to start over?
  • Most importantly, know your market stats specific to your listings — it is not a seller’s market for everyone, so don’t over promise what you can deliver if you know days on market or supply of homes in a particular segment may not generate a quick sale or multiple offers.

Investing in Our Community Panel Discussion

2017 Housing Summit Flyer 7.5.2017 - panel discussion

The last presentation of the summit was a panel discussion featuring Clark Krause, Executive Director of Boise Valley Economic Partnership (BVEP); Georgia Meacham, REALTOR® and housing advocate; Jeff Sayer, Managing Partner at Rectify Horizons; and moderator Chase Craig, REALTOR® and Vice Chair for BRR’s Data Strategies Advisory Group.

The topic of the panel was “Investing in Our Community,” and the discussion focused on developments happening in our region and around the state, as well as resources from the National Association of REALTORS®. The panelists talked housing affordability, innovative ideas for affordable housing, cost of living, quality of education, and wages. They also touched on factors businesses consider when looking to relocate or expand to the Boise region. Two recurring themes in the discussion were talent and infrastructure. We need to invest in, and attract capital for, building infrastructure and educating our workforce, both of which are needed as we continue to grow.

How does this all relate to BRR members? REALTORS® may sell homes, but they also change their communities. Georgia encouraged REALTORS® to get involved at the local, state, and national association level, to participate in the association’s community outreach efforts, and to invest in RPAC (the REALTOR® Political Action Committee) to protect homeownership and the real estate industry.

Panel

Event Photo Gallery

Buyer Demand and New Construction Pricing Drive the Boise Region’s Home Prices to Record Highs

Ada County’s median sales price in June 2017 reached $273,950, an increase of 8.7% over June 2016. The median sales price in Canyon County reached $184,000 last month, an increase of 12.4% compared to last year. Both were record highs.

Three things continue to drive prices up in the Boise Region: consumer demand, lack of inventory, and higher-priced new construction — not market speculation as was common a decade ago.

To measure each of these market drivers, we took a deeper look at activity for pending sales, months supply of inventory, and the median sales price for new construction.

Pending Sales is a key indicator of consumer/homebuyer demand, counting the number of homes under contract that should close within 30-90 days. In June 2017, there were 1,854 pending sales in Ada County, up 7.5% from the previous year. In Canyon County, there were 750 pending sales, up 10.8% from the previous year. In both counties, the year-over-year increase in pending sales was primarily due to new construction as buyers are finding it harder to find existing inventory, especially in the lower price points.

Months Supply of Inventory (sometimes referred to as absorption rate or supply-demand ratio) takes the number of homes for sale divided by the average number of closed sales. A balanced market—not favoring buyers or sellers—is typically between 4-6 months of supply.

In June 2017, the months supply of inventory for existing/resale and new construction combined was at 1.7 months in Ada County, down 15.0% from June 2016. Canyon County was at 1.8 months of inventory in June 2017, down 18.2% from the previous year. Here’s how that breaks down by each segment and by price point:

MSI tables 062017

June’s market data is indicating a more balanced new construction market in Canyon County, at 4.4 months of supply, an increase of 4.8% from last year. Also, buyers who prefer an existing home may have more luck in Canyon County, especially if they’re looking to purchase at $300,000 or above.

Ada County’s inventory for both existing and new lags behind demand in all price points, with a few exceptions: existing or new construction homes priced over $700,000, and at least in June 2017, new construction priced $160-$199,999, primarily in Kuna and Garden City.

Median Sales Price is the price at which half the homes sold for more, and half sold for less. Because more newly constructed homes are selling at higher price points, it’s bringing up the overall median price in both counties.

In June 2017, the median sales price for new homes in Ada County was $345,450, up 14.3% over June 2016. Further, 20.3% more new homes sold in June 2017 than June 2016. In Canyon County, the median sales price for new homes was $239,495, up 6.8% compared to last year, and 33.3% more new homes sold year-over-year.

For comparison, existing home sales in Ada County were down 3.5% year-over-year (due to fewer homes being available to purchase), and the median sales price was at $255,000, up 6.3% over June 2016.  In Canyon County, existing home sales were up 8.9% and the median sales price was at $175,350, up 11.9% over June 2016.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the June 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - June 17CANYON Snapshot - Jun 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,000 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

 

Registration is Open for the 2017 Annual Membership Meeting

AMM Logo - Color logo

 

The BRR Annual Membership Meeting is a FREE event for BRR Members! For more details, and to register, visit the event page.

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Sellers Take Note: No Signs of a Slow Down in Summer Home Sales

In May 2017, the average Days on Market (the cumulative number of days between when a property is listed and when it goes pending) for homes in Ada County was at 33 days and Canyon County was at 36 days. Factor in an additional 30-60 days to close and homes listed in the upcoming weeks may sell at some of the highest prices of the year. Based on monthly averages going back to 2004, homes that close in June, July, and August typically fetch the highest prices.

While inventory of existing homes is still tight in both counties compared to last year (down 15.3% in Ada County and down 20.6% in Canyon County compared to May 2016), there have been month-over-month improvements in the number of existing homes for sale, as more sellers hope to secure a summer closing.

  • February to March 2017, existing inventory grew by 8.8% in Ada County and by 23.2% in Canyon County
  • March to April 2017, existing inventory grew by 19.8% in Ada County and by 4.7% in Canyon County
  • April to May 2017, existing inventory grew by 25.3% in Ada County and by 14.2% in Canyon County

These inventory numbers are encouraging but more existing homes — especially priced under $300,000 — are needed to keep up with buyer demand.

The low inventory combined with the rate of pending sales resulted in an 11.8% year-over-year decrease in months supply of existing homes for sale in Ada County, ending at just 1.5 months of inventory. In Canyon County, the months supply of existing inventory was at 1.3 months in May 2017, down 23.5% year-over-year. (A balanced market is typically between 4-6 months of supply.)

Demand for new homes remained strong as this segment saw a 23.8% year-over-year increase in pending sales in Ada County and 20.1% in Canyon County. The months supply of new inventory was at 3.8 months and 4.2 months for Ada and Canyon counties, respectively, as of May 2017.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the May 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - May 17CANYON Snapshot - May 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,000 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

Pending Sales of Existing Homes Outpace Inventory in the Boise Region

Homes under contract, also called “pending sales,” are properties with an accepted offer that should close within 30-90 days. Because homes don’t typically go pending and close during the same month they’re listed, when inventory is very low, there can be more pending sales than homes available to purchase.

For the past three months in both Ada and Canyon County, pending sales of existing homes have outpaced inventory, as buyer demand continued to be strong throughout the spring market.

Ada County Inventory vs Pending Chart 052017 smaller Canyon County Inventory vs Pending Chart 052017 smaller

Taking a closer look at April 2017 in Ada County, 1,107 existing homes went under contract compared to the 891 existing homes that were available for sale. In Canyon County, 556 existing homes went under contract compared to just 401 existing homes available for sale.

Canyon County experienced this same three-month trend in February, March, and April 2016, but it reversed by May 2016. Ada County pending sales were only higher than inventory in April last year.

Low inventory has also affected closed sales figures for existing homes, with year-over-year declines in both counties. This is not a reflection of buyer demand, as seen by the pending sales figures mentioned, but more simply: buyers can’t buy homes that aren’t for sale.

While the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) is looking to builders to help solve the inventory shortage nationwide, locally, we need additional existing inventory to come online.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the April 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - April 17

CANYON Snapshot - April 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: Monthly pending sales data is not available prior to 2011, so the instances referenced are the only times we’ve seen this occur in our data set.

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,000 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.

Low Inventory of Existing Homes Continues to Drive Prices

The continued shortage of inventory compared to buyer demand has pushed the median sales price of existing/resale homes up near the record high in Ada County and set a new record in Canyon County.

As of March 2017, the median sales price for existing homes in Ada County was up 8.4% year-over-year, reaching $233,000. While this was an increase of 5.5% over February 2017, the previous high point was in June 2016 at $239,900.

In Canyon County, the median sales price for existing homes reached $164,700, up 10.2% compared to March 2016, and up 4.8% over February 2017. The previous high point was in July 2016 when the median sales price of existing homes reached $160,450.

While more existing homes are being listed each month as we move further into the spring market, it’s not enough to keep up with buyer demand. This is especially apparent when comparing current inventory to last year’s levels.

According to Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist for the National Association of REALTORS®, the key to fixing the inventory crunch is with homebuilders. They must increase inventory in all prices points to not only help current buyers but also existing homeowners who don’t know where they will move if they sell. As more new inventory becomes available, existing homeowners could move and free up properties in the low to middle price points.

We did see an uptick in the number of new homes for sale compared to last year, but again, existing inventory continued to lag:

Inventory as of March 31st March 2016 March 2017 YOY % Chg
Ada County

Existing/Resale

New Construction

 

1,062

734

 

744

793

 

-29.9%

+8.0%

Canyon County

Existing/Resale

New Construction

 

480

292

 

383

310

 

-20.2%

+6.2%

Builders know there is demand at all price points and they are eager to meet it. However, in order to be profitable, they often build homes at higher price points due to the constraints of higher material costs, land prices, and the shortage of labor. As existing home sellers are able to net more as prices increase, the hope is that they will choose to sell and move up in price point, especially as there are new homes available in the higher price points.

Additional information about trends within each county, by price point, by existing and new construction, and by neighborhood, are now available in the March 2017 Market Report. This report includes an explanation of the metrics and notes on data sources and methodology.

Download the latest market snapshot graphics for Ada County and Canyon County:

ADA Snapshot - March 17CANYON Snapshot - March 17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This report is provided by the Ada County Association of REALTORS®, which began doing business as Boise Regional REALTORS® (BRR) in 2016. BRR is the largest local REALTOR® association in Idaho, with over 4,000 members and two wholly-owned subsidiaries — the Intermountain Multiple Listing Service, Inc. (IMLS) and the Boise Regional REALTORS® Foundation. This report is based primarily on the public statistics provided by the IMLS, available at: intermountainmls.com/Statistics/Static.aspx. These statistics are based upon information secured by the agent from the owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is not guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in the counties or cities during the specified time period. The IMLS and BRR provide these statistics for purposes of general market analysis but make no representations as to past or future performance.  || The term “single-family homes” includes detached single-family homes with or without acreage, as classified in the IMLS. These numbers do not include activity for mobile homes, condominiums, townhomes, land, commercial, or multi-family properties (like apartment buildings). If you are a consumer, please contact a REALTOR® to get the most current and accurate information specific to your situation.